2020: Writing Goals for the New Year

For the New Year, I think it best to keep working on what I have already written, rather than start a new writing project. The first draft of M&M: The Tales of Tyrennia, Book II, is done and the first ten chapters are ready for beta reading. Therefore, a release of Book II looks rather promising.2020

My short story collection, that has been “on the back burner” for far too long, should be completed. I’ve decided to alternate between Book II and the collection. Edit a chapter, then edit a short story, then back to another chapter and so on. The shorts collection has seven titles, so it will be done relatively quickly and I can shift my undivided attention back to Book II.

I’m sure some minds are saying, “Shouldn’t this be titled ‘editing goals’ rather than ‘writing goals’”? Not in my case. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts long ago, I write bare-boned drafts (mostly dialog) and edit in an additive manner rather than a subtractive one. My first editing pass involves a lot of writing, like detailed descriptions, body language, ambiance, and the five senses.

On another note, I also plan on doing many more reviews this year. Of course I’m going to restrict them to books by Indie Authors.

Yes, I know these aspirations appear thin, but I believe in keeping things simple. I’ve found that when I set too large a goal and fail to reach it, I turn into my own worst critic.

What do you plan on writing about this year? Do you already have a work in progress? Are you already planning for NaNoWriMo 2020 in November or Camp NaNoWriMo in April?

Every Time You Reply Little Patrick Doesn’t Cry

Storm of Divine Light: About the Cover and Book Design

Do you like the cover and interior book design for Storm of Divine Light? I have to give credit where the true credit is due, namely, Creative Publishing Book Design. Before my first contact with Creative Publishing Book Design, I have to admit to having reservations. Too often I’ve read warnings from others about the vultures out there looking to scam a quick buck from unsuspecting Indie Authors.

Stormcover7blogAfter my first phone call, I was very impressed. They were quick and patient with me, but they also worked with me. I cannot overstate the importance of working with me. Instead of making me choose from some prefabricated generic covers, they looked at my initial sketches and built everything from that starting point. They even requested three chapters to develop a design that reflected the mood of the book.

Communication is a key factor

There were many emails, phone calls, and text messages. I must say, their answers were quick and accurate as were their attention to details and small adjustments. For example, I did not like the eyes of the figure on the cover. I thought, because the MC is a rogue, there should be an air of mystery about him. Within hours, the team at Creative Publishing Book Design made the adjustment.

The Results Were Worth the Money

I have some print editions from Indie Authors, and unfortunately, some of those books look like they belong in the “minor leagues”. The cover combined with the stunning interior make Storm of Divine Light (use the ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon) into a professional looking book, as if it was plucked from the shelf of a major book dealer.

I will contract them again for the next novel in my fantasy series, M & M: The Tales of Tyrennia: Book II. Why? Because I was treated like a valued client.

Have you ever contracted for covers and design? Got a horror story or an endorsement to share?

Don’t Go – Comment Below!

NaNoWriMo 2017: Week One Round up

Hi Folks,

Writing time has been scant, but I’ve been quite diligent and squeezing it in on a daily basis. I’ve taken my own advice from a previous post on how to make the time. It’s working.

Anyway, after seven days I’ve managed to bring my current work up to a 11,050 word count. I’ve also managed to attend the Treasure Valley Kick-off dinner, a write-in at very hospitable coffee shop in Boise, and hosted a write in luncheon in Mountain Home. There’s lots of indie authors out there.

How’s your NaNoWriMo 2017 project going? Comment below and let everyone know.

MHWI

Mountain Home Write In

 

NaNo2017

Treasure Valley Kick-Off Dinner

 

MJWI

Write In at Moxie Java in Boise

NaNoWriMo 2017: How To Find Your “Comfy-Zone”

Welcome to the final post in this series before NaNoWriMo 2017 begins on November 1st. So far, I have discussed my discovery of Chris Baty and how my mindset during previous NaNoWriMo attempts was wrong. In subsequent posts I talked about how my notions concerning writing goals and time management have evolved.

NaNoWriMo 2017

Courtesy of NaNoWriMo

Now I’m going to reveal how to personalize your NaNoWriMo 2017 project, get into your personal “Comfy-Zone” and enjoy your writing instead of feeling pressured.

Let’s Get Personal

I’m sure you have a laptop and/or a desktop. However, you’ve been using them for a while now. You should acquire (and I heartily recommend this one) a new thumb drive or external hard drive for saving your writing.

As you may know from experience, writing involves more tools than computers and other electronic goodies. There’s nothing like having a small notebook and a pen on your person at all times. You have a few days left, go and purchase those items. After all, you’ll take firm ownership of your writing project and make it more personal. Of course you do not have to spend a proverbial arm and a leg for these items either. Just make sure you don’t use them for grocery lists. They should have only one purpose.

I’ve Got the Time if You’ve Got the Place

You don’t need a laptop to write outside your home (although it’s nice to have one). If you have a notebook, you can write anywhere. Coffee shops are a great place to park and pump out some verbiage. Remember, you must keep your NaNoWriMo writing project special. Therefore, once you’ve picked a foreign nesting area for writing, don’t go there unless you plan to write.

The Company You Keep

Although NaNoWriMo is about your novel, the idea started from a dozen would-be authors in San Francisco. There’s an element of group camaraderie baked into the idea. Make that coffee shop time to write and hang out with other NaNoWriMo indie authors. You’ll learn how others help to refuel and recharge your creative batteries. Just bear in mind that you’re there to write or have a “write-in”, not to have some author group therapy session.

Indie authors writing

A NaNoWriMo “write-in” at a coffee shop

If you don’t have other authors in your area, you can always use the NaNoWriMo site for finding writing buddies.

Have you used any of these “Comfy-Zone” strategies before? Going to try them now? Keep me informed.

 

 

 

Every Time You Reply Little Frankie Doesn’t Cry

The Great Indie Author Twitter Challenge

I’ve seen some blogs and articles posted over the last few months that have referred to eBooks by Indie Authors as complete crap. Indie Author stigma is alive and well in the blogosphere and within the pages of The Huffington Compost. One blogger classified 98% of the eBooks written by Indie Authors as crap (her word, not mine). Can any of these opinions be true? Or are these negative purveyors just out for a “late-night-troll”?

In response to these naysayers, I’ve decided to offer myself a small challenge. Perhaps you may care to indulge in this experiment yourself.

Step1: Go into Twitter and start scrolling. Stop at the first eBook promo Tweet that has an Amazon link. Usually the Tweet is from the Indie-Author him/herself.

Step2: Follow the link and use the “Look Inside” feature.

Step 3: Jot down what you thought of preview.

Step 4: Go back to Twitter and keep scrolling until you find another eBook promo.

** I took a glance at 25 eBooks using the “Look Inside” feature. **

thinker.png

The Results of the Twitter Challenge

In the final analysis, I did not find 98% crap, nor would I say that Indie Authored eBooks are an insult to the written word. Yes, I saw some stylistic problems. I have learned much about editing in the past few years, and can zero things down to three basic errors or should I say non-refinements. They are 1) Echoing Headwords 2) Weak opening line and/or paragraph 3) Overusing forms of “to be.” However, some readers probably wouldn’t spot those problems. They purchased a bargain book and were entertained.

For those of us who have published a few items and have spent hundreds of hours in critique circles; we know crap when we see it. Perhaps I’m being too harsh and wonder if I should give some people the benefit of the doubt. May be their definition of “crap” differs from mine.

Here are a few examples of my criteria for assessing the quality of an eBook with an excrement expression.

The writing is unreadable and unintelligible. If I see an endless stream of poor grammar, spelling errors, punctuation errors, p.o.v. shifting, or incomplete sentences, then I’ll agree it is crap. I can name a few more sins, but I think you get the picture.

Different “Yardsticks”?

There is no difference between 1 inch and 2.54 centimeters. The difference is the markings on the ruler. It is my belief that the insulters and naysayers are driven by one of two possibilities. Either they are paid trolls acting upon the behest of publishers*, or they are “setting the bar too high.”

*I am by no means a conspiracy theorist. However, I am all too aware of the dirty campaigns waged by different factions of certain industries. For example, the war between Edison’s DC vs. Tesla’s AC in the court of public opinion comes to mind.

The Relay Race Analogy

When I say “setting the bar too high,” I am not talking about giving everyone an award or a trophy for participating or a drastic lowering of standards. Rather, imagine a relay race between two teams of runners. Except, one team got food poisoning just 5 minutes before the race, and only one member of the sick team didn’t fall ill. Instead of quitting, the lone runner ran the whole race that was meant for five different athletes. And, he didn’t make it easy for the other team. He gave them a proverbial “run for their money.”

Even though he lost the race, is there any among you who wouldn’t give that runner a standing ovation?

hands

Well, that’s the difference between an eBook from an Indie Author and Traditionally published book. Too often, an Indie Author is simply one person doing the work of many hands. Therefore, when I say “setting the bar too high,” I mean passing judgment while not appreciating the lopsided nature of the comparison.

Indie Authors should not attempt to produce an end product as good as a traditionally published book. We should strive to be better.

DSC00166Every Time You Reply – “Little Frankie” Doesn’t Cry