NaNoWriMo is Almost Upon Us

Another November is about to come around again, and that means it’s NaNoWriMo time! For those of you who haven’t heard of it, #NaNoWriMo is National Novel Writing Month. I have never really been a participant. There was one in April 2014, and I tried (but only half-heartedly) and managed to squeeze out one chapter, as evidenced by an earlier blog post Thank You NaNoWriMo for Chapter 14 .

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Image courtesy of National Novel Writing Month

I’ve read a couple of interesting blog posts about it and now I’ve decided to really give it a whirl. There are supposedly prizes, badges, and other accolades for authors who complete their novel and reach their word-count goal. I’m not concerned about winning a contest though; I really want to just finish the first draft of my #fantasy novel The First Light, and move on, as they say.

A blog post by Mark, The Aspirant Wordificer, seems to have prodded me into this decision. So why did this particular post inspire me? The article has espoused the same feelings about NaNoWriMo that I harbored. He worked it out in a rather logical / comical way. I laughed quite a bit because it was almost as if I had written that post. I feel the same desire to finish, coupled with the same anticipation of frustration and aggravation from a mountain of papers to edit.

Besides putting yourself on task, NaNoWriMo is also a great way to meet other #indieauthors, scout the forums for some great links, or #writetips and maybe make a few more author friends.

Are you going to try your hand during this November’s NaNoWriMo?

 

Locked in a Genre Box

As I peruse author blogs geared toward helping indie writers market themselves, I keep seeing particular sentiments repeating themselves: You have to pick a genre and stick to it. If you change genres, you should publish under a different name. And so on. Each tidbit of information seems to be another wall in the genre box.

That may be well and good for others, but not me. Since I wear many different hats, I write like that as well.  If you’ve been scanning my blog posts, you may have noted that the categories are diverse. Also, if you noticed the links for my short stories, you would note that Martha’s Kitchen is horror, while Stasis has a Libertarian theme.

I was raised on Hitchcock and The Twilight Zone. Therefore, I sometimes lean that way when I write. But I am also a Libertarian, and likewise, I sometimes let my creative juices flow in that direction. I also love J.R.R. Tolkien, Role Playing Games (RPG’s) like the classic Dungeons & Dragons or Pathfinder, along with some online versions. So it’s no surprise that my novel will fall under the Fantasy category.

Are you locked in a genre box? What advantages or disadvantages have you found in sticking to a genre, or in attacking multiple fields?